Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate

The Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate (APP) was a public-private partnership launched in 2005, and terminated in April 2011. It was comprised of seven countries – Canada, Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea, and the United States and was designed to deploy and diffuse clean energy technologies and spread the adoption of clean energy among Asia-Pacific countries. The Partnership employed a cooperative, international public-private partnership model that brought together the private sector, governments and research institutions to address climate change and air pollution challenges.

The APP provided a framework for international cooperation to facilitate the development, diffusion, deployment, and transfer of existing, emerging and longer term cost- effective, cleaner, more efficient technologies and practices among the Partners through concrete and substantial cooperation. These efforts enabled the partners involved in achieving practical results and facilitated attainment of the Partners' respective national pollution reduction, energy security and climate change objectives.

Overall, 175 projects and 22 flagship projects were endorsed by the APP from 2005 to 2011.

For more information on the Partnership, please visit the APP international website.

Canada’s Involvement

Canada joined the APP in October 2007 and was an active member in the Partnership. Between 2008 and 2011, the Government of Canada invested in 35 APP projects within the energy-intensive and energy supply sectors that offered the greatest potential to address climate change and air pollution challenges. The $13M invested by the Government in energy-intensive projects was matched by an investment of close to $100M from the public and private sector.

APP projects provided a platform to showcase Canadian innovation in countries like China, India, Japan, Korea, and the U.S., contributed to reducing GHGs, provided economic benefits to Canadians, and accelerated the development of clean technologies. Canada’s participation in the APP supported its domestic, continental and international efforts to address climate change.

You can find out more on APP projects in which Canada was involved in by clicking on the following sector of activity:


Aluminum Projects

The global aluminum industry is changing in response to increased input costs, environmental performance requirements and other global pressures. Each part of the aluminum production process has environmental impacts that need to be managed in different ways. As a result, the aluminum industry has been exploring ways of reducing energy consumption and increasing productivity under the APP.

Canada's aluminum industry supports the Government of Canada's efforts to address climate change and clean air. During its participation in the Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate, Canada has contributed to the following projects in collaboration with the Aluminum Task Force of the APP:

Management of Greenhouse Gases (perfluorocarbon (PFCs)) Emissions in Aluminum Smelters
Canada’s Contribution: $475, 000
Targeted Country/Region: China and India
Funding Period: 2009/2010
Project Description: This project was intended to develop a procedure and indices for benchmarking and measuring GHG emissions from aluminum smelters and to provide China and India with baseline knowledge to facilitate data collection.  The project also aimed at helping China and India to do so by using Canadian emissions reduction technologies and in plant management techniques.
Achievements: The project led to the inventory of PFC emissions at four smelters in China, the training of Chinese experts on PFC Emissions Standard Measurement Protocol, and the creation of a PFC management Guide. 


Management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China
Canada’s Contribution:  $20,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description:  Canada’s funds contributed towards the purchase of technology to help China monitor progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.  This project aimed at enabling all primary production facilities in China to identify and implement cost-effective, technically-feasible opportunities to reduce primary sources of GHGs during aluminum production. This can be accomplished by providing relevant tools for developing GHG inventories and adopting smelter-specific GHG emission reduction strategies.  
Achievements: Two Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers were purchased, and six Chinese technicians were trained on how to measure greenhouse gas emissions using this technology.


Building & Appliances Projects

Reducing the energy use for buildings and appliances has the potential to cut costs and reduce GHG emissions greatly. Energy efficient buildings and appliances also reduce greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions. As the buildings and appliances sectors are very energy-intensive, Canada’s participation in the APP’s Building & Appliances Task Force was a natural fit. Canada has contributed to the following projects and initiatives:

Zero Energy Homes Dialogue and Demonstration Projects (ZEH)
Canada’s Contribution: $495 000
Targeted Country/Region: India, China, Australia, Korea and the US
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The Zero Energy Homes (ZEH) Dialogue and Demonstration Projects aimed to enhance understanding of ZEH among partner countries as a means to create enabling conditions for the diffusion of ZEH.  This project was selected as an APP Flagship project for its exemplar contribution to the partnership.
Achievements: The project enabled the Energy Efficiency Exporters Alliance to facilitate dialogue, conduct research and lead workshops on the development and deployment of ZEH. The enhanced dialogue and collaboration has enabled Canadian ZEH industry to identify opportunities for investment created by the current focus on energy efficiency and has helped leverage financial support from partner countries.


Net Zero Energy Ready Community in Shanghai
Canada’s Contribution: $975,000
Targeted Country/Region: Shanghai, China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The objective of this project was to develop, deploy and promote clean technologies to build an energy efficient and sustainable community of multi-family dwellings with zero energy ready standards in the outskirts of Shanghai.
Achievements: This project has successfully demonstrated zero energy ready housing in China and has confirmed the ability for a single family home to achieve considerable reduction of CO2 emissions.  The Canadian expertise was featured in the Shanghai Municipal Government Exhibit as part of the Shanghai Expo, toured by over 70M visitors. Overall, the project has enhanced the credibility of Canadian expertise and has resulted in new business opportunities for energy efficient housing in China. 


Sustainable Condos for China
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: Chongqing, China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project consisted in the design and construction of a life-sized demo condo designed as an educative travelling display to illustrate and promote leading-edge sustainable building design, products, technologies and systems. The project focused on five areas of sustainability for the design of the condo: energy, water, land-use healthy living and materials.
Achievements: The condo effectively reduced energy consumption and proved more sustainable than the regular China condo. The project allowed a Canadian company’s design to be showcased abroad. Given the Chongquin region is planning to build millions of condos in the next five years, there is now much potential for this Canadian condo design to be considered for social housing. By engaging the green building community and the average home buyer, the condo exhibit helped foster a shift towards sustainable urban living, acted as a catalyst for reducing GHG emissions from the building sector, and enhanced Canada’s image as an international leader in sustainability. Indeed, there were more than 200,000 visitors and many additional guests who visited the condo’s website. The project therefore successfully promoted Canadian technologies and provided a market place for sustainable building.


Energy Efficient Housing in Ottawa
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: Ottawa, Canada
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project consisted of the creation of a 4.3 hectare development of energy-efficient housing in Ottawa to demonstrate technologies to achieve Energy Efficient Housing. The housing development used an innovative design incorporating green technologies such as regeneration and solar thermal to reduce the environmental impact of the new community and achieve zero energy targets.
Achievements: The project contributed to improving the performance and increasing the understanding of technology options for reducing GHG emissions in the buildings sector.


Resource Positive Envelope Design - Next Generation Green Buildings
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project was design to support the enhancement of existing national and international networks to share research on a green building envelope design (including walls, roofs, and foundations) that would have the potential to reduce by 75% GHG emissions associated with the heating, cooling and construction of buildings.
Achievements: Results from the project will contribute to longer term objectives of achieving positive environmental and economic impact. The project led to research on green building envelope design that reduces GHG emissions associated with heating, cooling and constructions of buildings. Further, as part of the project, the City of Vancouver signed an MOU with the Sino-Singapore Eco-City to construct a Canadian Net Zero R&D Centre in China. 


Jinqiao Net Zero Energy Townhouse
Canada’s Contribution: $375, 000
Targeted Country/Region: Shanghai, China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project consisted of developing zero energy ready townhouse units as a means to demonstrate and evaluate the concept of zero housing into a growing sector of the Chinese housing market.
Achievements: Training was provided to designers, engineers, contractors and regulatory officials in state of the art zero carbon residential building design. In doing so, the project gained profile for Canadian Green House Businesses as leaders in the local market. The project was able to prove the viability of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in one of the fastest growing housing markets in the world.


Tianjin Eco-City Project
Canada's Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project was to develop concept drawings for the construction of a high-end international school, located in Tianjin, China. The project involved working with multiple developers and configurations of government and quasi-government offices, who were all stakeholders in the success of the implementation of sustainable development policies.
Achievements: The project successfully designed and delivered a series of workshops on green building technologies and sustainable neighbourhood design, and developed strong relationships with key players in Tianjin enhancing Canada's reputation as a leader in sustainability.


Water Source Heat Pump in Guangdong Coastal Region
Canada’s Contribution: $400,000
Targeted Country/Region: Jiangmen Municipality, Guangdong Province, China,
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project was to demonstrate the technological applicability and financial viability of geothermal heat pump applications in the Nanjing City Square. The Nanjing City Square is the future home to the Nanjing Municipal Government. The square consists of 4 L-shape, 17-story connected towers and the project objective is to service 160,000 m2 by ground source heat pump air conditioning and heating. 
Achievements: The project showed significant environmental benefits and as a result of using clean energy, the project demonstrated annual savings of approximately 881 tonnes of standard coal. The amount saved in coal is equivalent to a reduction of 2,334 tonnes per year of CO2 emissions as well as a reduction of SO2 by 12,334 kg / year.


Transfer of the EcoEnergy Retrofit Program to Japan
Canada’s Contribution: $240,000
Targeted Country/Region: Japan
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: The project consisted primarily of adapting and transferring the EcoEnergy Retrofit program that has been developed over the past two decades in Canada for use in Japan. The project involved documenting the program structure, operation and market penetration. The project aimed to transfer technologies and capacities such as energy auditing, energy analysis, air tightness testing, air sealing and re-Insulation to the Japanese construction sector.
Achievements: Depending on the climate, energy supply, the existing condition of the home and the energy efficiency measures implemented GHG reductions on the order of 2 to 6 tons CO2 equivalent per year per household was anticipated from adopting this program. This translates to the potential for annual GHG reductions between 1,632,000 and 4,896,000 tonnes CO2 equivalent per year. Ultimately, reductions in GHG gained from EcoEnergy Retrofit program would contribute to Japan's stated goal of 25 % cut in GHG emissions by 2020 compared with 1990 levels.


Latin-America Value Chain Mapping
Canada’s Contribution: $83,145
Targeted Country/Region: Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and Costa Rica
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: This project focused on determining the current capacity of housing development, primary actors, and the supporting economic, social, and regulatory environments that influence housing energy efficiency in four South American countries.
Achievements: The project enabled APP partner countries to explore ZEH with non-APP countries in Latin America.


Cleaner Fossil Energy Projects

In aggregate, Asia Pacific Partnership Partner countries accounted for 54% of global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption. Canada recognized that coal, oil and gas are and will remain critical fuels for all seven Partner economies. Against a background of increasing energy demand in the Asia-Pacific region, there is a need to improve the efficiency and environmental performance of fossil fuel use. Canada has contributed to projects that aimed at achieving efficiencies and performance improvements in the stationary use of coal, oil and gas:

Reduction of GHG Emissions and Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in the Upstream Oil & Gas Industry in China
Canada’s Contribution: $489,175
Targeted Country/Region:  China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project aimed to facilitate the development of GHGs and Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC) emissions reductions at upstream oil and gas facilities in China, through transfer of technical expertise and support.
Achievements: The projects’ activities consisted of transferring technical expertise and providing technical support in identifying major cost-effective emission reduction opportunities, evaluating control options, and implementing solutions.


Yanji Landfill Gas Recovery
Canada’s Contribution: $350,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The main motive of the project was to recover landfill gas currently going to the atmosphere from 2 landfills near Yanji City in China and use it to generate electrical power.
Achievements: The funding went toward the project design document for the Clean Development Mechanism Program, its validation and registration with the UNFCCC, a feasibility study, the fulfillment of an Environmental Impact Assessment, as well as drill wells to test gas flows before finalizing the size of equipment for the Project.


Technologies and Methods for Monitoring, Measurement, and Verification (MMV) for Carbon Capture Storage (CCS)
Canada’s Contribution: $287,500
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project was a partnership between the Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and St.Francis Xavier University. It aimed at injecting CO2 and N2 and O2impurities at about a 250 m depth in an aquifer and observing the relative movement and preferential immobilization under the Inner Mongolia Desert.
Achievements: The first Canadian CO2 capture-specific demonstration of importance helped develop Canadian and Chinese capacity to undertake high performance Measurement, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) tools.


China-Canada Deep Un-mineable Coal CO2 Sequestration Project
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Partner: Petromin Resources Ltd
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project aimed at making efforts to reduce greenhouse gases by furthering the development of technology for CO2 injection and storage in deep coal beds and determine the suitability and capacity of coal seams in China as long-term storage sites for CO2. The project also had for mandate to collect important data relative to the potential commerciality of enhanced coal bed methane production using CO2 injection.
Achievements: The project involved the transfer and development of Canadian CO2 enhanced CO2 storage technology in China. In doing so, Canadian leading edge technology was showcased, increasing its potential to be applied and replicated elsewhere in the world, thus creating additional markets for Canada's clean energy expertise and know-how.


Advanced Natural Gas Storage Trailers for use in Standby and Distributed Power Generation
Canada’s Contribution:  $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: India
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project aimed at facilitating the transfer and commercialization of natural gas storage technologies from Canada in India in order to mitigate GHG emissions from power generation.
Achievements: In efforts to mitigate climate change, the project catalyzed and facilitated the transfer and adoption of a Canadian Composite Cylinder technology in India. When deployed in India, the technology allowed CO2 emissions from standby generators to be reduced by 15% as a result of switching fuels from diesel to natural gas.


Collaborative Feasibility Studies of Coal-fired Power Plant full-scale capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery Capacity Building
Canada’s Contribution: $248,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: This project aimed at setting the stage for a much longer collaboration in GHG reduction technology enabling activities. The up-scaled demonstration of coal fired power plant post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) technology is a key step to advance the goal of commercial deployment of the technology, which is widely considered an approach with great potential for large scaled GHG emission reduction.
Achievements: This project helped stimulate GHG emission reductions and a reduction of energy intensity levels beyond the scope and timeframe of the project. This project also proved to be a sustainable model both environmentally and economically.


Coal Mining Projects

The coal industry recognizes it must meet the challenge of environmental sustainability; it must reduce its greenhouse gas emissions in particular if it is to remain a part of a sustainable energy future. Through its participation in the APP Canada contributed to projects and initiatives that led to improve mine safety, greater mine productivity, and increased revenues:

Coal Mine Health and Safety
Canada’s Contribution: $25,000
Targeted Country/Region: Australia, China, India, Japan, US.
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project aimed at developing a strategic approach toward risk management to advance toward the goal of zero fatalities and injuries in the coal mining industry in partner countries. 
Achievements:  This project contributed in identifying leading practices to control health and safety risks, while identifying expertise and resources within Partner countries. It included work in automation, enhancement of rescue operations, improved communication and regulation capabilities, and monitoring procedures. 


Extinguishing Underground Coal Seam Fires
Canada’s Contribution: $ 250,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010
Project Description: Underground coal seam fires account for approximately 4% of GHG emissions in China. This project aimed at providing the expertise, machinery and know-how to extinguish underground coal fires, while concurrently mitigating GHG emissions resulting from these very fires. The project also had for objective to trainour Chinese partner to operate systems at the numerous underground fires throughout China.
Achievements: Technology improvements and developments were transferred to further China’s capacity in extinguishing the fires. This capacity-building exercise has acted as a pillar in working toward the Asia Pacific Partnership’s broader objective of reducing net GHGs.


Cement Projects

Through its participation in the Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate, Canada supported efforts to address climate change and air pollution in the cement sector. To this end, Canada contributed to projects and initiatives that supported efforts to further improve the energy efficiency of cement production technologies, and to promote the increase use of alternative and renewable energy and supplementary cementing materials. Canada participated in the following projects:

Transferring energy efficient Cement technology to China
Canada’s Contribution: $450,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The overall objective of the project was to support the cement and concrete industry’s efforts to address the challenges of a carbon-constraint future by reducing the amount of clinker required per unit of cement material. The technology was developed in collaboration with a large consortium of prominent Canadian companies including major cement producers.
Achievements: The project worked on identifying compatibility requirements between the Canadian program and the Chinese context, developed data collection methodologies and procedures and promoted Canadian energy efficient cement technologies through workshops and consultations with Chinese local industry.


Infrastructure Sustainability Initiative
Canada’s Contribution: $355,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The objective of this initiative was to assess the applicability and facilitate the transfer of technologies and tools that would help improve the sustainability of relevant above-ground and below-ground infrastructure in China. The infrastructure systems in China are and will be expanding rapidly, offering a one-time opportunity to make design/construction decisions that will have lasting positive effects from environmental, social and economic perspectives.
Achievements: The project worked toward bringing environmental, social and economic benefits by transferring Canadian green infrastructure technologies to China. The project resulted in the development of infrastructure life-cycle assessment tools reflecting Chinese design and operational considerations.


Microalgae from GHG to produce renewable fuels
Canada’s Contribution: $280,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The overall objective of the project was to contribute in reducing GHGs produced by the cement industry by deploying high energy biomass fuels technology to cement plants in China. Biological remediation of CO2 is currently the most effective methodology to reduce GHG emissions from cement production. Micro algae is a form of biological remediation of CO2 which consumes CO2 as feedstock and produces biofuel in quantities per acre that are many times more than corn, soy, palm oil or switch grass.
Achievements: The project conducted a feasibility study of the technologies in China to assess future use and deployment of Pond Biofuels Inc. technology in China’s cement plants.


Replacing Coal in the Global Cement Industry
Canada’s Contribution: $246,000
Targeted Country/Region: Canada
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: The objective of this project was to work toward improving the greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions from cement operations. The desired outcome of the project was to contribute to the deployment of energy-efficient substitution of biomass for coal in commercial cement manufacturing facilities around the globe to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions substantially.
Achievements: The development and deployment of Canadian clean technologies to cement producers in developing and emerging economies has contributed substantially to mitigating GHG emissions around the globe.


Power Generation and Transmission Projects

The seven Partner countries of the Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate produce approximately 54% of the world's electricity. Improvement in power generation and transmission efficiency in Partners thus had the potential to reduce the emissions of millions of tons of CO2 and pollutants. Through its participation in the APP's Power Generation and Transmission Task Force, Canada participated in projects that accelerated the adoption of world-best practice in the power generation and transmission sectors. These projects are:

Investigation for Demonstration of Plasma Ignition System
Canada’s Contribution: $50,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: This project was designed to complement an existing Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) project which China led with other APP countries. It aimed at implementing Canadian plasma systems to enhance energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions in China.
Achievements: The project generated novel utilizations and implementations of a plasma system for the Canadian power sector to enhance energy efficiency and reduce emissions. It successfully demonstrated the technology for ignition purposes in China and promoted energy efficiency for the coal power sectors in Canada and China.  This project has brought about great potential to mitigate GHGs in the Canadian and Chinese power sectors.


Thermal Power Plant Efficiency Improvement for Reduced GHG Emissions in India
Canada’s Contribution:  $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: India
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project aimed at providing early market enabling opportunities for India to fully leverage the technology and expertise from project partners to reduce thermal power plant CO2 emissions.
Achievements: Efforts were made to deploy technologies to increase thermal power plant efficiency in India. During the project, Environment Canada worked to facilitate the transfer of technology and its early adoption in India’s thermal plants. The project allowed clean technology to be demonstrated and optimized so it can be readily replicated across India.


Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation Projects

Renewable energy technologies, such as hydro (large and mini), solar, geothermal, wind and tidal can deliver power with virtually zero emissions. Distributed generation, including landfill waste methane-based generation, also has the potential to significantly reduce emissions and promote greater cost and network efficiencies. Canada has contributed to projects that focused on wide scale deployment of renewable energy, diversifying sources of energy supply, and contributing to the improvement of energy security in partner countries.

Clean Energy Pipeline to Ultra Clean Generation
Canada’s Contribution: $498,000
Targeted Country/Region: APP Countries
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The project built on a highly innovative concept of combining fuel cell and pipeline technologies, resulting in a distributed generation unit with a very high gas to power efficiency and 13 times less NOx emissions than a standard combined cycle plant. The concept forms a distributed generation unit with a very high gas to power efficiency.
Achievements: This project focused on funding the data acquisition and analysis of the performance of the power plant. Investments in data acquisition systems were made in order to provide data to a project website meant to enable researchers and gas and power utility engineers in APP countries to monitor the performance of the system.


Conversion of Wood Residues Biomass to Ethanol
Canada’s Contribution:  $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The desired outcome of the project was to focus on the key factors that limit the efficient bioconversion of selected wood residues to ethanol and other high value product. The development of a commercially viable cellulosic ethanol process is critical in reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and in reducing GHG emissions.
Achievements: The project was carried out by scientists based in 3 Asia Pacific Partership countries (i.e. Canada, China, USA) working collaboratively to advance the development and eventual deployment of a cellulosic ethanol process.


Concentrated Photovoltaic Solar Power Plant Demonstration
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The purpose of this project was to build a demonstration scale solar power plant using the highest performance technology while simultaneously demonstrating a technology platform that can be rapidly scaled to very large power plants. Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) solar power technology offers the highest conversion efficiency of any solar power technology.
Achievements: This Canada-led project allowed the development of a 200KW demonstration plant which by itself avoids 124,000 tons of CO2 emissions per year that would otherwise be produced from coal power plants. Throughout the project, a team of 3 companies exemplified the state of the art capabilities from Canada, US, and China. The project achieved a number of China’s national priorities, that being reducing greenhouse gas generation, providing rural/remote area electrification, and creating local jobs.


Tidal Current Energy Conversion Systems
Canada’s Contribution:  $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: Korea
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This initiative involved the design and manufacturing of a utility scale tidal current energy conversion system based on technology owned by a Canadian Company. The project also leveraged a unique opportunity to test this Canadian technology in a Korean pilot tidal power plant for a year. The overall objectives were to develop a better understanding of energy conversion technologies and to facilitate a significant advancement of tidal current power technologies in Canada.
Achievements: The project acted as a pillar in the study and improved understanding of the interaction of tidal current energy conversion technology with electricity grids which is critical for the deployment of tidal current power. The project also facilitated the acceleration of the development and deployment of tidal power technologies through international collaboration including Canadian, Korean and US partners.


Wind turbine for remote village hook-up
Canada’s Contribution: $500,000
Targeted Country/Region: India
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: This project aimed at deploying the MARS technology in India, with the objective of developing and increasing rural electrification across the country and developing renewable energy in the fight against climate change.
Achievements: The project’s overall outcome was to deploy the MARS technology in India to fully leverage this technology in the country and introduce sustainable wind power into the electricity mix for rural villages that are off grid. The project was able to showcase the MARS technology at both the national and international level, thereby encouraging the future development and deployment of the technology around the globe.


Demonstration, Analysis and Market Transformation of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) for India
Canada’s Contribution:  $446,160
Targeted Country/Region:  India
Funding Period: 2009/2010 and 2010/2011
Project Description: The intent of this project was to prove Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) technology for India, deliver utility system-relevant performance metrics and a market analysis, transfer best available knowledge and technology, and execute an appropriate market transformation strategy for India.
Achievements: The project was able to further develop and test the potential of the electrical power savings, energy, and renewable energy delivery potential of GSHP systems for heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating in the different climate and geological contexts of southern Asia.


Heat Pump for Air Conditioning and Heating in Guangdong Coastal Region (Jiangmen City)
Canada’s Contribution: $243,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: The principal intent of the project was to demonstrate the technological applicability and financial viability of geothermal heat pump applications in the coastal regions of South China. The initiative was meant to have a direct impact on Chinese GHG emissions as the result of using clean technologies and also to strengthen Canadian companies’ positions in Central China.
Achievements: This project successfully deployed and promoted the use of Canadian Heat Pump technologies in China.


Demonstration of Waste to Energy Systems
Canada’s Contribution:  $244,000
Targeted Country/Region: China
Funding Period: 2010/2011
Project Description: The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a complete waste-to-energy system utilizing plasma gasification of organic waste hydrogen recovery fuel cell electricity generation. Plasma gasification is a process where plasma torches are used to melt inorganic compounds and to gasify organic compounds in high temperature (exceeding several thousand degrees) to produce synthetic gas. Since the process involves very high temperature, almost all hazardous elements are destroyed, and therefore, plasma gasification is one of the cleanest methods of treating wastes.
Achievements: This project was carried out at a pilot plant in Cheongsong, South Korea, where the hydrogen recovery equipment was already in place. This is one of the first times where a full ‘waste to energy’ solution was demonstrated in a pilot scale. Support received for this project has contributed to Canada’s leading position in the development and manufacturing of fuel cell products.

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